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The pagan roots of Easter - The Guardian
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Dr. Jai Maharaj
2017-04-16 15:51:54 UTC
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The pagan roots of Easter

The Guardian
Saturday, April 3, 2010

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/belief/2010/apr/03/easter-pagan-symbolism

Jai Maharaj, Jyotishi
Om Shanti

http://bit.do/jaimaharaj
Dr. Jai Maharaj
2017-04-16 20:07:34 UTC
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The pagan roots of Easter
The Guardian
Saturday, April 3, 2010
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/belief/2010/apr/03/easter-pagan-symbolism
The Pagan Origin Of Easter

http://www.lasttrumpetministries.org/tracts/tract1.html

Jai Maharaj, Jyotishi
Om Shanti

http://groups.google.com/group/alt.fan.jai-maharaj
Steve Hayes
2017-04-16 21:32:18 UTC
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Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
The pagan roots of Easter
The Guardian
Saturday, April 3, 2010
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/belief/2010/apr/03/easter-pagan-symbolism
The Pagan Origin Of Easter
That article is 7 years old, and has been superseded by this one:

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/belief/2011/apr/23/easter-pagan-roots

The modern myth of the Easter bunny
Adrian Bott
There is no definitive historical evidence that a goddess named Eostre
and her hare companion was part of pagan folklore
Easter Bunny statue
People walk past an Easter bunny statue at the entrance of Berlin's
Britz area on Good Friday during the cherry blossom festival.
Photograph: Fabrizio Bensch/Reuters

Saturday 23 April 2011 15.00 BST

Did you know that Easter was originally a pagan festival dedicated to
Eostre, the Anglo-Saxon goddess of spring, whose consort was a hare,
the forerunner of our Easter bunny? Of course you did. Every year the
fecund muck of the internet bursts forth afresh with cheery
did-you-know explanations like this, setting modern practices in a
context of ancient and tragically interrupted pagan belief.

The trouble is that they are wrong. The colourful myths of Eostre and
her hare companion, who in some versions is a bird transformed into an
egg-laying rabbit, aren't historically pagan. They are modern
fabrications, cludged together in an unresearched assumption of pagan
precedence.

Only one piece of documentary evidence for Eostre exists: a passing
mention in Bede's The Reckoning of Time. Bede explains that the lunar
month of Eosturmonath "was once called after a goddess... named
Eostre, in whose honour feasts were celebrated."

However, even this may only have been supposition on Bede's part. In
the same section he says the winter festival of Modranecht was so
named "because (we suspect) of the ceremonies they enacted all that
night," hardly the statement of a historian with first-hand
information.

Eosturmonath may simply mean "the month of opening", appropriate for a
time of opening buds and arguably a better fit for the rest of the
Anglo-Saxon months. They tended to be named after agricultural or
meteorological events, hence "mud-month" and "blood-month". Only one
other month is, according to Bede, named after a goddess – Hrethmonath
– and like Eostre, there is no other evidence of Hretha anywhere.

Known Anglo-Saxon deities like Woden and Thor are paralleled in Norse
and Germanic pre-Christian religion, but there are no such equivalents
to Bede's Eostre and Hretha, which strengthens the case for them being
inventions. Grimm explored the possibility of a German "Ostara" in
Deutsche Mythologie, but in the absence of any primary evidence, all
he could produce was conjecture. We're also left wondering why, if
Eosturmonath really was named after a pagan goddess, the staunch
Christian Charlemagne chose it to replace the old Roman name of April.

There are no images of Eostre, no carvings, no legends, and no
association with hares, rabbits or eggs. Yet a swift Google search
turns up heaps of repeated Eostre lore. Even the usually formidable
Snopes.com allocates Eostre her customary sacred hare, without any
historical justification. So where do the tales come from?

The answer is found in the recent history of modern self-identified
paganism. Back in the days when Catweazle was on telly, the movement
was inchoate, disparate and in urgent need of roots. It was in the
difficult position of claiming moral heirship from ancient
pre-Christian religion, but having very few credentials to back that
up.

Usefully, though, there was already a tendency (stemming from
Victorian anthropology) to imagine repressed pagan roots dangling from
anything sufficiently working class and folksy; and though academia
had moved away from this, pagan revivalism had not. By asserting
Christian appropriation of pagan customs as fact, modern paganism
could claim both precedence and wrongful treatment, citing Pope
Gregory's letter as if that settled it.

Pagan origins were thus claimed for everything from Father Christmas
to Morris dancing and the Easter bunny was retroactively recast as
Eostre's sacred hare, grafting a faked pagan provenance on to a
creature first mentioned as late as 1682. A Ukranian folk tale about
the origins of pysanky, painted eggs, was rewritten to star Eostre and
her bunny. Some still claim Eostre's name is the root of the word
oestrogen, ignoring that human eggs are microscopic and that the real
etymology of oestrogen in fact relates to the gadfly.

Today's self-identified pagans are often happy to correct such
misrepresentations, yet the grudge-laden narrative of jolly fertility
festivals hijacked by Christians persists despite their efforts. One
wonders what this country's pagan Celts would have made of it:
occupied and massacred by the pagan Romans, then displaced by invading
pagan Angles and pagan Saxons who were in turn invaded by the pagan
Vikings. Those bloody invasions still have cultural relevance today,
much more so than a manufactured grievance over stolen bunnies.

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/belief/2011/apr/23/easter-pagan-roots
Dr. Jai Maharaj
2017-04-16 21:54:48 UTC
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Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
The pagan roots of Easter
The Guardian
Saturday, April 3, 2010
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/belief/2010/apr/03/easter-pagan-symbolism
The Pagan Origin Of Easter
http://www.lasttrumpetministries.org/tracts/tract1.html
Pagan Festivals stolen by Christians

Forwarded message from "G.Subramaniam" <***@comcast.net>

[ From: "G.Subramaniam" <***@comcast.net>
[ Subject: Pagan Festivals stolen by Christians
[ Date: Saturday, March 6, 2004

Link to website
http://geocities.com/christprise/

Pagan Festivals stolen by Christians

Christianity stole Christmas

Despite the wild held popular belief, there is actually
no biblical text that even declares the birth date of
Christ as being the 25th of December, nor will we find
any biblical evidence that gives any indication of a
winter season birth. There is neither any external
historical confirmation for the Story of Jesus outside of
the New Testament, with accounts even being internally
contradictive with also many examples as to how
Literalist Christians have adopted and imitated the
winter festival and birthday's of other pagan gods as
their own in disregard to its own doctrine. Basic
biblical coordinates usually pin point to a mid summer
birth of Jesus which some officals later tried to
correct, seeing shepherds only guarded their flocks day
and night during lambing time. (Luke 2:8) This gives
certain exposure to the unrational mind that its very
obvious that shepherds were never blatantly foolish
enough to keep their flocks out at night in chilly winter
conditions on freezing mountain slopes.

The Winter Solstice

The major winter festival that the ancient pagans
celebrated was held when the Sun reached the point
farthest south of the equator as stated. Beginning Dec
21st, and ending Dec 25th. The winter solstice is the
renewing of the Sun every year. The Sun appears at its
most southerly position, directly overhead at the Tropic
of Capricorn (23 degrees 27 minutes south latitude). The
winter solstice has become the birthday of several pagan
gods: Attis, Frey, Thor, Dionysus, Osiris, Adonis,
Mithra, Tammuz, Cernunnos and so forth. Romans also
celebrated the festival of the Saturnalia from December
17th to the 24th to honor the Greek god Saturn (Saturday)

Saturnalia originated as a thanksgiving celebration to
commemorate the winter planting. which consisted of a
period of goodwill, devoted to visiting friends and
swapping gifts. From December 25th, until the spring
equinox, was the "40 days" (which later became Christian
Lent)

Christ took his birthday of December 25th from Mithra
during the winter solstice that celebrated the Natalis
Solis Invicti (the Birthday of the Inconquerable Sun).

Natalis Solis Invicti signaled the birth of a young Sun
god who sprang from a rock or a cave in the form of a
newborn infant.

It was not until the 4th century that Literalist
Christians actually began celebrating the birth of Jesus
Christ himself. In 313 CE, Constantine declared December
25th, the official birthday of Jesus.

In the year 375 CE, Pope Julius I too declared the
Nativity of the birth of Jesus as December 25th to win
over followers of Mithras. That is why Jesus received his
official birthday of December 25th in alignment of the
ancient sun-gods in the Roman Empire.

Christianity stole Santa Claus

Odin(Anglo-Saxon Woden) in Norse mythology was the
supreme god known for annually sweeping across the land
during the winter solstice, bringing food, wine, and joy
once a year, and by rewarding good children with fruit
and nuts.

The German Odin, was seen as a giant, with a robe lined
with fur, and holly with ivy or mistletoe on his head,
carrying a Yule Log. Odin also rode a horse called
Sleipnir, which had eight legs, able to travel over land
and water. Odin's son Thor, also appeared in a chariot in
the sky as Santa does in a sleigh. It wasnt until the
1920's that it was discovered that there were no
reindeers in the North Pole that had been portrayed, but
were all along flourishing in Lapland, Finland. People
just accepted these popular stories as true. Instead of
the north pole, the legends of Santa today derive mostly
from around Scandinavia

Christianity stole Easter

The actual ancient origins of Easter is when the Sun
rises in the East.

The word Easter comes from the Anglo-Saxon goddess of
fertility "Eostra" (Oestre in latin) Ishtar or Astarte
who appeared about 1430 BCE in Egyptian records.

Oestre was the personification of spring to the early
pagans.

In the Old Testament, Astarte the Phoenician goddess of
fertility is called "Ashtoreth the goddess of the
Sidonians" and Ashtaroth, the plural form of the name, is
used with the meaning "pagan goddesses." The festival of
Oestre, or the dying or rising of the Sun in the East,
occurred during the Vernal (Spring) Equinox.

When Day and Night are in equal length. During the second
century Christian missionaries eager to convert the
Teutonic tribes of northern Rome adopted much of the the
annual features of this event as the Saxons held the
great spring festival in honor of Oestre to mark the
resurrection and the rebirth of nature. Christians later
adopted this into the resurrection and rebirth of Christ.


Yet, no Christian historian has been able to give an
exact date of Jesus' death and crucifixion.

Christianity stole Valentines Day

Valentine's Day comes from the pagan celebration and
ancient Roman holiday of Lupercalia, which was held on
the 15th of February to honor the Roman goddess Juno, the
most powerful moon goddess.

The festival of Lupercalia included banquets, dancing,
sacrifices and sexual mating. During the celebration,
young naked men struck the thongs of women who came near
them.

A strike from the thong was supposed to render the woman
fertile.

The festival also saw young men drawing small "love
notes" from a container composed by eligible young women.
The men, who socialised with them attempted to guess who
had composed the note that they had drawn. In this way,
the festival brought young men and women together, to
ensure the fertility of the people, fields, and flocks.

In CE 496, Pope Gelasius outlawed the Lupercian festival,
but cleverly retained and borrowed, the pagan program
asserts by modifying it with Christian mascots. The
Lupercian festival was then replaced with St. Valentines
Day, and since Valentinus had been martyred on February
14th, the Church was also able to preempt the annual
February 15th celebration of Lupercalia.

Christianity stole Halloween

The festival of Halloween comes from the Ancient Celts
and Druids who date back around 700 BCE to 400 CE that
lived in what is now the United Kingdom, Ireland,
Scotland, Wales and northern France. On November 1st, The
ancient Celts started their new year and celebrated the
festival of "Samhain".

(The Celtic lord of death) The celebration marked the
beginning of the season of the cold, darkness, and decay.
(The period of little Sun). Samhain is often named the
"Last Harvest" or "Summer's End". It naturally became
associated with human death. The night before, October
31st, the boundary between the natural world, and the
afterworld was opened and the dead would roam and mingled
freely among the living for one night before winter
began.

In the 700's, Pope Gregory III affirmed the celebrations
of the All Saints' Day, All Hallows Eve" (which became
Halloween) to be officially moved from May 13th, to
November 1 in alignment to the Celtic festival of
Samhain.

It became a observance in honor of Catholic saints. The
Celtic Church and especially the Catholic Church
transformed Cernuous, the horned god and the oldest of
the pagan Celtic deities to symbolise Satan in the
Christian religion. Much of the ancient Celtic culture
was either destroyed or adopted into Christian purposes.
Many Halloween traditions even today have been past down
from the Ancient Celts, such as the Jack-o-Lantern used
during the festival of Samhain, that were carved from
large turnips to ward off evil spirits.

Christians transformed many symbols of the Moon into evil
and satanic also; such as the frogs, bats, wolves, cats
in order to detach people from the Goddess. Words such
as: Lunatic (Moon) Tart (Tarot) Monster (Moon-Star) etc

Christianity is stealing Pongal

Pongal is a Tamil Hindu festival in honor of the Sun God

In order to make converts among illiterate people, the
church is celebrating Pongal as a harvest festival.

End of forwarded message from "G.Subramaniam" <***@comcast.net>

Jai Maharaj, Jyotishi
Om Shanti

http://bit.ly/1EM9nsg
Steve Hayes
2017-04-17 07:29:55 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
The pagan roots of Easter
The Guardian
Saturday, April 3, 2010
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/belief/2010/apr/03/easter-pagan-symbolism
The Pagan Origin Of Easter
[ Subject: Pagan Festivals stolen by Christians
[ Date: Saturday, March 6, 2004
Christianity stole Easter
The actual ancient origins of Easter is when the Sun
rises in the East.
The word Easter comes from the Anglo-Saxon goddess of
fertility "Eostra" (Oestre in latin) Ishtar or Astarte
who appeared about 1430 BCE in Egyptian records.
Another hoary old 19th-century urban legend

https://ondermynende.wordpress.com/2009/04/08/eostre-the-making-of-a-myth/
--
Steve Hayes
http://www.khanya.org.za/stevesig.htm
http://khanya.wordpress.com
Dr. Jai Maharaj
2017-04-17 21:43:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
The pagan roots of Easter
The Guardian
Saturday, April 3, 2010
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/belief/2010/apr/03/easter-pagan-symbolism
The Pagan Origin Of Easter
http://www.lasttrumpetministries.org/tracts/tract1.html
Pagan Festivals stolen by Christians
[ Subject: Pagan Festivals stolen by Christians
[ Date: Saturday, March 6, 2004
Link to website
http://geocities.com/christprise/
Pagan Festivals stolen by Christians
Christianity stole Christmas
Despite the wild held popular belief, there is actually
no biblical text that even declares the birth date of
Christ as being the 25th of December, nor will we find
any biblical evidence that gives any indication of a
winter season birth. There is neither any external
historical confirmation for the Story of Jesus outside of
the New Testament, with accounts even being internally
contradictive with also many examples as to how
Literalist Christians have adopted and imitated the
winter festival and birthday's of other pagan gods as
their own in disregard to its own doctrine. Basic
biblical coordinates usually pin point to a mid summer
birth of Jesus which some officals later tried to
correct, seeing shepherds only guarded their flocks day
and night during lambing time. (Luke 2:8) This gives
certain exposure to the unrational mind that its very
obvious that shepherds were never blatantly foolish
enough to keep their flocks out at night in chilly winter
conditions on freezing mountain slopes.
The Winter Solstice
The major winter festival that the ancient pagans
celebrated was held when the Sun reached the point
farthest south of the equator as stated. Beginning Dec
21st, and ending Dec 25th. The winter solstice is the
renewing of the Sun every year. The Sun appears at its
most southerly position, directly overhead at the Tropic
of Capricorn (23 degrees 27 minutes south latitude). The
winter solstice has become the birthday of several pagan
gods: Attis, Frey, Thor, Dionysus, Osiris, Adonis,
Mithra, Tammuz, Cernunnos and so forth. Romans also
celebrated the festival of the Saturnalia from December
17th to the 24th to honor the Greek god Saturn (Saturday)
Saturnalia originated as a thanksgiving celebration to
commemorate the winter planting. which consisted of a
period of goodwill, devoted to visiting friends and
swapping gifts. From December 25th, until the spring
equinox, was the "40 days" (which later became Christian
Lent)
Christ took his birthday of December 25th from Mithra
during the winter solstice that celebrated the Natalis
Solis Invicti (the Birthday of the Inconquerable Sun).
Natalis Solis Invicti signaled the birth of a young Sun
god who sprang from a rock or a cave in the form of a
newborn infant.
It was not until the 4th century that Literalist
Christians actually began celebrating the birth of Jesus
Christ himself. In 313 CE, Constantine declared December
25th, the official birthday of Jesus.
In the year 375 CE, Pope Julius I too declared the
Nativity of the birth of Jesus as December 25th to win
over followers of Mithras. That is why Jesus received his
official birthday of December 25th in alignment of the
ancient sun-gods in the Roman Empire.
Christianity stole Santa Claus
Odin(Anglo-Saxon Woden) in Norse mythology was the
supreme god known for annually sweeping across the land
during the winter solstice, bringing food, wine, and joy
once a year, and by rewarding good children with fruit
and nuts.
The German Odin, was seen as a giant, with a robe lined
with fur, and holly with ivy or mistletoe on his head,
carrying a Yule Log. Odin also rode a horse called
Sleipnir, which had eight legs, able to travel over land
and water. Odin's son Thor, also appeared in a chariot in
the sky as Santa does in a sleigh. It wasnt until the
1920's that it was discovered that there were no
reindeers in the North Pole that had been portrayed, but
were all along flourishing in Lapland, Finland. People
just accepted these popular stories as true. Instead of
the north pole, the legends of Santa today derive mostly
from around Scandinavia
Christianity stole Easter
The actual ancient origins of Easter is when the Sun
rises in the East.
The word Easter comes from the Anglo-Saxon goddess of
fertility "Eostra" (Oestre in latin) Ishtar or Astarte
who appeared about 1430 BCE in Egyptian records.
Oestre was the personification of spring to the early
pagans.
In the Old Testament, Astarte the Phoenician goddess of
fertility is called "Ashtoreth the goddess of the
Sidonians" and Ashtaroth, the plural form of the name, is
used with the meaning "pagan goddesses." The festival of
Oestre, or the dying or rising of the Sun in the East,
occurred during the Vernal (Spring) Equinox.
When Day and Night are in equal length. During the second
century Christian missionaries eager to convert the
Teutonic tribes of northern Rome adopted much of the the
annual features of this event as the Saxons held the
great spring festival in honor of Oestre to mark the
resurrection and the rebirth of nature. Christians later
adopted this into the resurrection and rebirth of Christ.
Yet, no Christian historian has been able to give an
exact date of Jesus' death and crucifixion.
Christianity stole Valentines Day
Valentine's Day comes from the pagan celebration and
ancient Roman holiday of Lupercalia, which was held on
the 15th of February to honor the Roman goddess Juno, the
most powerful moon goddess.
The festival of Lupercalia included banquets, dancing,
sacrifices and sexual mating. During the celebration,
young naked men struck the thongs of women who came near
them.
A strike from the thong was supposed to render the woman
fertile.
The festival also saw young men drawing small "love
notes" from a container composed by eligible young women.
The men, who socialised with them attempted to guess who
had composed the note that they had drawn. In this way,
the festival brought young men and women together, to
ensure the fertility of the people, fields, and flocks.
In CE 496, Pope Gelasius outlawed the Lupercian festival,
but cleverly retained and borrowed, the pagan program
asserts by modifying it with Christian mascots. The
Lupercian festival was then replaced with St. Valentines
Day, and since Valentinus had been martyred on February
14th, the Church was also able to preempt the annual
February 15th celebration of Lupercalia.
Christianity stole Halloween
The festival of Halloween comes from the Ancient Celts
and Druids who date back around 700 BCE to 400 CE that
lived in what is now the United Kingdom, Ireland,
Scotland, Wales and northern France. On November 1st, The
ancient Celts started their new year and celebrated the
festival of "Samhain".
(The Celtic lord of death) The celebration marked the
beginning of the season of the cold, darkness, and decay.
(The period of little Sun). Samhain is often named the
"Last Harvest" or "Summer's End". It naturally became
associated with human death. The night before, October
31st, the boundary between the natural world, and the
afterworld was opened and the dead would roam and mingled
freely among the living for one night before winter
began.
In the 700's, Pope Gregory III affirmed the celebrations
of the All Saints' Day, All Hallows Eve" (which became
Halloween) to be officially moved from May 13th, to
November 1 in alignment to the Celtic festival of
Samhain.
It became a observance in honor of Catholic saints. The
Celtic Church and especially the Catholic Church
transformed Cernuous, the horned god and the oldest of
the pagan Celtic deities to symbolise Satan in the
Christian religion. Much of the ancient Celtic culture
was either destroyed or adopted into Christian purposes.
Many Halloween traditions even today have been past down
from the Ancient Celts, such as the Jack-o-Lantern used
during the festival of Samhain, that were carved from
large turnips to ward off evil spirits.
Christians transformed many symbols of the Moon into evil
and satanic also; such as the frogs, bats, wolves, cats
in order to detach people from the Goddess. Words such
as: Lunatic (Moon) Tart (Tarot) Monster (Moon-Star) etc
Christianity is stealing Pongal
Pongal is a Tamil Hindu festival in honor of the Sun God
In order to make converts among illiterate people, the
church is celebrating Pongal as a harvest festival.
Origin of Easter from Ishtar and Ishtar from Hindu
Goddess.(part -1)

jayasreesaranathan.blogspot.com
March 30, 2013

https://jayasreesaranathan.blogspot.com/2013/03/origin-of-easter-from-ishtar-and-ishtar_31.html

Jai Maharaj, Jyotishi
Om Shanti

http://ow.ly/UIz9w
Dr. Jai Maharaj
2017-04-22 01:33:29 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
The pagan roots of Easter
The Guardian
Saturday, April 3, 2010
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/belief/2010/apr/03/easter-pagan-symbolism
The Pagan Origin Of Easter
http://www.lasttrumpetministries.org/tracts/tract1.html
Pagan Festivals stolen by Christians
[ Subject: Pagan Festivals stolen by Christians
[ Date: Saturday, March 6, 2004
Link to website
http://geocities.com/christprise/
Pagan Festivals stolen by Christians
Christianity stole Christmas
Despite the wild held popular belief, there is actually
no biblical text that even declares the birth date of
Christ as being the 25th of December, nor will we find
any biblical evidence that gives any indication of a
winter season birth. There is neither any external
historical confirmation for the Story of Jesus outside of
the New Testament, with accounts even being internally
contradictive with also many examples as to how
Literalist Christians have adopted and imitated the
winter festival and birthday's of other pagan gods as
their own in disregard to its own doctrine. Basic
biblical coordinates usually pin point to a mid summer
birth of Jesus which some officals later tried to
correct, seeing shepherds only guarded their flocks day
and night during lambing time. (Luke 2:8) This gives
certain exposure to the unrational mind that its very
obvious that shepherds were never blatantly foolish
enough to keep their flocks out at night in chilly winter
conditions on freezing mountain slopes.
The Winter Solstice
The major winter festival that the ancient pagans
celebrated was held when the Sun reached the point
farthest south of the equator as stated. Beginning Dec
21st, and ending Dec 25th. The winter solstice is the
renewing of the Sun every year. The Sun appears at its
most southerly position, directly overhead at the Tropic
of Capricorn (23 degrees 27 minutes south latitude). The
winter solstice has become the birthday of several pagan
gods: Attis, Frey, Thor, Dionysus, Osiris, Adonis,
Mithra, Tammuz, Cernunnos and so forth. Romans also
celebrated the festival of the Saturnalia from December
17th to the 24th to honor the Greek god Saturn (Saturday)
Saturnalia originated as a thanksgiving celebration to
commemorate the winter planting. which consisted of a
period of goodwill, devoted to visiting friends and
swapping gifts. From December 25th, until the spring
equinox, was the "40 days" (which later became Christian
Lent)
Christ took his birthday of December 25th from Mithra
during the winter solstice that celebrated the Natalis
Solis Invicti (the Birthday of the Inconquerable Sun).
Natalis Solis Invicti signaled the birth of a young Sun
god who sprang from a rock or a cave in the form of a
newborn infant.
It was not until the 4th century that Literalist
Christians actually began celebrating the birth of Jesus
Christ himself. In 313 CE, Constantine declared December
25th, the official birthday of Jesus.
In the year 375 CE, Pope Julius I too declared the
Nativity of the birth of Jesus as December 25th to win
over followers of Mithras. That is why Jesus received his
official birthday of December 25th in alignment of the
ancient sun-gods in the Roman Empire.
Christianity stole Santa Claus
Odin(Anglo-Saxon Woden) in Norse mythology was the
supreme god known for annually sweeping across the land
during the winter solstice, bringing food, wine, and joy
once a year, and by rewarding good children with fruit
and nuts.
The German Odin, was seen as a giant, with a robe lined
with fur, and holly with ivy or mistletoe on his head,
carrying a Yule Log. Odin also rode a horse called
Sleipnir, which had eight legs, able to travel over land
and water. Odin's son Thor, also appeared in a chariot in
the sky as Santa does in a sleigh. It wasnt until the
1920's that it was discovered that there were no
reindeers in the North Pole that had been portrayed, but
were all along flourishing in Lapland, Finland. People
just accepted these popular stories as true. Instead of
the north pole, the legends of Santa today derive mostly
from around Scandinavia
Christianity stole Easter
The actual ancient origins of Easter is when the Sun
rises in the East.
The word Easter comes from the Anglo-Saxon goddess of
fertility "Eostra" (Oestre in latin) Ishtar or Astarte
who appeared about 1430 BCE in Egyptian records.
Oestre was the personification of spring to the early
pagans.
In the Old Testament, Astarte the Phoenician goddess of
fertility is called "Ashtoreth the goddess of the
Sidonians" and Ashtaroth, the plural form of the name, is
used with the meaning "pagan goddesses." The festival of
Oestre, or the dying or rising of the Sun in the East,
occurred during the Vernal (Spring) Equinox.
When Day and Night are in equal length. During the second
century Christian missionaries eager to convert the
Teutonic tribes of northern Rome adopted much of the the
annual features of this event as the Saxons held the
great spring festival in honor of Oestre to mark the
resurrection and the rebirth of nature. Christians later
adopted this into the resurrection and rebirth of Christ.
Yet, no Christian historian has been able to give an
exact date of Jesus' death and crucifixion.
Christianity stole Valentines Day
Valentine's Day comes from the pagan celebration and
ancient Roman holiday of Lupercalia, which was held on
the 15th of February to honor the Roman goddess Juno, the
most powerful moon goddess.
The festival of Lupercalia included banquets, dancing,
sacrifices and sexual mating. During the celebration,
young naked men struck the thongs of women who came near
them.
A strike from the thong was supposed to render the woman
fertile.
The festival also saw young men drawing small "love
notes" from a container composed by eligible young women.
The men, who socialised with them attempted to guess who
had composed the note that they had drawn. In this way,
the festival brought young men and women together, to
ensure the fertility of the people, fields, and flocks.
In CE 496, Pope Gelasius outlawed the Lupercian festival,
but cleverly retained and borrowed, the pagan program
asserts by modifying it with Christian mascots. The
Lupercian festival was then replaced with St. Valentines
Day, and since Valentinus had been martyred on February
14th, the Church was also able to preempt the annual
February 15th celebration of Lupercalia.
Christianity stole Halloween
The festival of Halloween comes from the Ancient Celts
and Druids who date back around 700 BCE to 400 CE that
lived in what is now the United Kingdom, Ireland,
Scotland, Wales and northern France. On November 1st, The
ancient Celts started their new year and celebrated the
festival of "Samhain".
(The Celtic lord of death) The celebration marked the
beginning of the season of the cold, darkness, and decay.
(The period of little Sun). Samhain is often named the
"Last Harvest" or "Summer's End". It naturally became
associated with human death. The night before, October
31st, the boundary between the natural world, and the
afterworld was opened and the dead would roam and mingled
freely among the living for one night before winter
began.
In the 700's, Pope Gregory III affirmed the celebrations
of the All Saints' Day, All Hallows Eve" (which became
Halloween) to be officially moved from May 13th, to
November 1 in alignment to the Celtic festival of
Samhain.
It became a observance in honor of Catholic saints. The
Celtic Church and especially the Catholic Church
transformed Cernuous, the horned god and the oldest of
the pagan Celtic deities to symbolise Satan in the
Christian religion. Much of the ancient Celtic culture
was either destroyed or adopted into Christian purposes.
Many Halloween traditions even today have been past down
from the Ancient Celts, such as the Jack-o-Lantern used
during the festival of Samhain, that were carved from
large turnips to ward off evil spirits.
Christians transformed many symbols of the Moon into evil
and satanic also; such as the frogs, bats, wolves, cats
in order to detach people from the Goddess. Words such
as: Lunatic (Moon) Tart (Tarot) Monster (Moon-Star) etc
Christianity is stealing Pongal
Pongal is a Tamil Hindu festival in honor of the Sun God
In order to make converts among illiterate people, the
church is celebrating Pongal as a harvest festival.
Origin of Easter from Ishtar and Ishtar from Hindu
Goddess.(part -1)
jayasreesaranathan.blogspot.com
March 30, 2013
https://jayasreesaranathan.blogspot.com/2013/03/origin-of-easter-from-ishtar-and-ishtar_31.html
Part 2 - Origin of Easter from Ishtar and Ishtar from Hindu Goddess

http://jayasreesaranathan.blogspot.in/2013/03/origin-of-easter-from-ishtar-and-ishtar_4874.html

Jai Maharaj, Jyotishi
Om Shanti

http://tinyurl.com/JaiMaharaj
fanabba
2017-04-16 20:32:06 UTC
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Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
The pagan roots of Easter
The Guardian
Saturday, April 3, 2010
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/belief/2010/apr/03/easter-pagan-symbolism
Jai Maharaj, Jyotishi
Om Shanti
http://bit.do/jaimaharaj
Dhanyavaad for your post, Dr. Jai Maharaj Jee !
Steve Hayes
2017-04-16 21:18:26 UTC
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Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
The pagan roots of Easter
The Guardian
Saturday, April 3, 2010
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/belief/2010/apr/03/easter-pagan-symbolism
That article is 7 years old, and has been superseded by this one:

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/belief/2011/apr/23/easter-pagan-roots

The modern myth of the Easter bunny
Adrian Bott
There is no definitive historical evidence that a goddess named Eostre
and her hare companion was part of pagan folklore
Easter Bunny statue
People walk past an Easter bunny statue at the entrance of Berlin's
Britz area on Good Friday during the cherry blossom festival.
Photograph: Fabrizio Bensch/Reuters

Saturday 23 April 2011 15.00 BST

Did you know that Easter was originally a pagan festival dedicated to
Eostre, the Anglo-Saxon goddess of spring, whose consort was a hare,
the forerunner of our Easter bunny? Of course you did. Every year the
fecund muck of the internet bursts forth afresh with cheery
did-you-know explanations like this, setting modern practices in a
context of ancient and tragically interrupted pagan belief.

The trouble is that they are wrong. The colourful myths of Eostre and
her hare companion, who in some versions is a bird transformed into an
egg-laying rabbit, aren't historically pagan. They are modern
fabrications, cludged together in an unresearched assumption of pagan
precedence.

Only one piece of documentary evidence for Eostre exists: a passing
mention in Bede's The Reckoning of Time. Bede explains that the lunar
month of Eosturmonath "was once called after a goddess... named
Eostre, in whose honour feasts were celebrated."

However, even this may only have been supposition on Bede's part. In
the same section he says the winter festival of Modranecht was so
named "because (we suspect) of the ceremonies they enacted all that
night," hardly the statement of a historian with first-hand
information.

Eosturmonath may simply mean "the month of opening", appropriate for a
time of opening buds and arguably a better fit for the rest of the
Anglo-Saxon months. They tended to be named after agricultural or
meteorological events, hence "mud-month" and "blood-month". Only one
other month is, according to Bede, named after a goddess – Hrethmonath
– and like Eostre, there is no other evidence of Hretha anywhere.

Known Anglo-Saxon deities like Woden and Thor are paralleled in Norse
and Germanic pre-Christian religion, but there are no such equivalents
to Bede's Eostre and Hretha, which strengthens the case for them being
inventions. Grimm explored the possibility of a German "Ostara" in
Deutsche Mythologie, but in the absence of any primary evidence, all
he could produce was conjecture. We're also left wondering why, if
Eosturmonath really was named after a pagan goddess, the staunch
Christian Charlemagne chose it to replace the old Roman name of April.

There are no images of Eostre, no carvings, no legends, and no
association with hares, rabbits or eggs. Yet a swift Google search
turns up heaps of repeated Eostre lore. Even the usually formidable
Snopes.com allocates Eostre her customary sacred hare, without any
historical justification. So where do the tales come from?

The answer is found in the recent history of modern self-identified
paganism. Back in the days when Catweazle was on telly, the movement
was inchoate, disparate and in urgent need of roots. It was in the
difficult position of claiming moral heirship from ancient
pre-Christian religion, but having very few credentials to back that
up.

Usefully, though, there was already a tendency (stemming from
Victorian anthropology) to imagine repressed pagan roots dangling from
anything sufficiently working class and folksy; and though academia
had moved away from this, pagan revivalism had not. By asserting
Christian appropriation of pagan customs as fact, modern paganism
could claim both precedence and wrongful treatment, citing Pope
Gregory's letter as if that settled it.

Pagan origins were thus claimed for everything from Father Christmas
to Morris dancing and the Easter bunny was retroactively recast as
Eostre's sacred hare, grafting a faked pagan provenance on to a
creature first mentioned as late as 1682. A Ukranian folk tale about
the origins of pysanky, painted eggs, was rewritten to star Eostre and
her bunny. Some still claim Eostre's name is the root of the word
oestrogen, ignoring that human eggs are microscopic and that the real
etymology of oestrogen in fact relates to the gadfly.

Today's self-identified pagans are often happy to correct such
misrepresentations, yet the grudge-laden narrative of jolly fertility
festivals hijacked by Christians persists despite their efforts. One
wonders what this country's pagan Celts would have made of it:
occupied and massacred by the pagan Romans, then displaced by invading
pagan Angles and pagan Saxons who were in turn invaded by the pagan
Vikings. Those bloody invasions still have cultural relevance today,
much more so than a manufactured grievance over stolen bunnies.

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/belief/2011/apr/23/easter-pagan-roots
--
Steve Hayes
http://www.khanya.org.za/stevesig.htm
http://khanya.wordpress.com
James
2017-04-21 06:36:02 UTC
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Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
The pagan roots of Easter
Yes, that is why genuine Christians do not mix in pagan rituals with
Christian teachings. (mixing light and darkness-- the apostle Paul)
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
The Guardian
Saturday, April 3, 2010
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/belief/2010/apr/03/easter-pagan-symbolism
Jai Maharaj, Jyotishi
Om Shanti
http://bit.do/jaimaharaj
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tesla sTinker
2017-04-21 19:27:03 UTC
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Post by James
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
The pagan roots of Easter
Yes, that is why genuine Christians do not mix in pagan rituals with
Christian teachings. (mixing light and darkness-- the apostle Paul)
exactly... I did just get through looking at a site in Courde Alene
Idaho of the United States and in it is a Novus Ordo Church under the
now claimed Poop Francis, and it states on this site that shows photos
of priests and a traditional altar with the four beasts point diamond
crucifixs, wearing bishop hats, and its clause on that site states on
that very site that they have absolute no vows to Almighty God
whatsoever. This is said of in pagan pride of course. Against Jesus.
Now, what do you tell your children about such a place as this about
that....???? I do mean, they have the whole altar
set up gimmick, and that they believe they can do this before Almighty
God and get away with it....

If you go there, you are likely to be caught up in the punishment God
will send upon them for displaying such bull shit evils about the true
Catholic Faith and Church as that, and get caught in the crossfire of
God's wrath and His punishments.


To top that off, they have no sacraments at all, because it is clear in
the Holy Scriptures, that they will do this and it says, and all for the
show off reasons of that they can do it. No Sacraments. No Altar. God
said so... We shall see what takes place next, and that is why you stay
way far away from pagan altars, AS God had told you to do so....

Of course, its only logical that these are freemasons posing as the
Catholic Church, of which it is not at all anything but the very opposite.

This is all a part of the euro
thief, that is robbing the United States.... Sellers in the temple.
$$$$ The euro is a communist document and a big false one. Very
illegal highly, and is treason on the people of europe not to mention,
the people of the world. Just that one false document destroys all
currency economics by removing the market graphs from the system itself
permmiting much manipulation of the currencies worth. In this way, they
have stolen very much money,
not to mention, ,many buildings. Yes,freemasons.

For Easter has no pagan roots, No one else has ever done the
Resurrection for the forgiveness of sins. This is the proof of it.
No other besides, pagan is a define of a witch, same as a freemason,
which means, they defile everything especially Jesus. Our God never
did this. Defilement.
No one else has ever done the new covenant testament, as Our Lord Jesus
Christ did in obeying the true God the Father Almighty and His
Scriptures. It is also, following the old testament truths of that yes,
He was supposed to do of these sacred things for the Almighty God. And
He did do them. And, He will come again
to judge the living and the dead. That is certain. Weathering anyone
likes it or not.
Post by James
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
The Guardian
Saturday, April 3, 2010
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/belief/2010/apr/03/easter-pagan-symbolism
Jai Maharaj, Jyotishi
Om Shanti
http://bit.do/jaimaharaj
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Mr. B1ack
2017-04-22 05:41:29 UTC
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Post by James
Post by Dr. Jai Maharaj
The pagan roots of Easter
Yes, that is why genuine Christians do not mix in pagan rituals with
Christian teachings. (mixing light and darkness-- the apostle Paul)
No "genuine Christians" left in the world then ...

Sorry, but "Easter" is just one religion glomming on
to several older ones.

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